Posts Tagged ‘death’

A Rendezvous with Death: Bearing Trials with Patience

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A Rendezvous with Death: Bearing Trials with Patience

I like to reminisce about the days I used to be bald. Not many people have had the experience, or should I say privilege, of knowing what it feels like to run your fingers through absolutely nothing but a palette of warmth resonating from the top of your head, smooth as a
baby’s bottom.

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My Heart Kaleidoscope

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My Heart Kaleidoscope

That day was an eclipse of my heart kaleidoscope. The word kaleidoscope is derived from Ancient Greek and literally translates as “observer of beautiful forms”. One looks through one end of the kaleidoscope while light enters the other end and mirrors reflect images of startling juxtapositions. Some enchant you with a sea of patterned colors while others entrap your worries in a whimsical world of beauty.

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Life is a Journey, Not a Destination

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Life is a Journey, Not a Destination

Why does it become so difficult for us to accept the decree of Allah ta’ala? When we are on a train, we look forward to reaching out destination. We look forward to whom we will see and what we will do. However, on the train of life, we don’t look forward to the destination at the end, the akhira.

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Your Hand Will Be a Witness

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Your Hand Will Be a Witness

I’ve been wearing the “hijab” for a long time – for nearly seven years. And what I mean by “hijab” is wearing a khimar, a scarf on my head. Throughout elementary school and middle school, I never even thought about wearing full hijab. I always thought that girls who wore full hijab had a superiority complex about themselves… that just because they wore proper hijab, they assumed they were automatically better. Not to mention they judged girls who wore a khimar with skinny jeans, calling it “half-hijab.”

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Like a Shattered Snow Globe

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Like a Shattered Snow Globe

While growing up, my brother and I were taught salah, Arabic, and recitation of the Qur’an. Each Ramadan, my parents would observe adamantly and devoutly the fasts and taraweeh prayers. Eid was always a delightful experience, observing prayers at the mosque or local community center or school. My religion was a part of my daily routine. Each prayer was observed obligatorily, without question or much understanding. My parents never forced or thrust any requirements to wear hijab or our traditional dress. Yet in me, there was a missing piece – as if my heart and soul knew that there was something a bit more to my faith than routine observation.

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