My Hijab, My Story

Out of the Ordinary

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Out of the Ordinary

I grew up in an “ordinary” family. What is “ordinary,” you may ask? “Ordinary” as in, not praying, listening to music, not wearing hijab, and leaving my heart to blacken while distancing myself more and more from Allah subhanahu wa ta’ala. Over the past few years, Allah ta’ala has strengthened my eman and that of my family, and may He continue to strengthen it. Ameen.

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Advice from a Friend

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Advice from a Friend

It’s funny how less than eight months ago, I would cringe at the thought of dressing more modestly. I looked down upon friends of mine that were practicing Muslims, and considered them to be on their way to “extremism,” may Allah forgive me for thinking this. One day, I was making my way through the mall when I bumped into a girl who was wearing the niqab and all black. I paused for a moment, confused as to who this woman who was staring at me was.

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After 9/11

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After 9/11

Living life in this dunya is not easy for the Muslims. Muslims face so many difficulties, right and left. I also faced many hardships in my struggle to practice Islam. There is an ayah in the Qur’an: “Or think you that you will enter Paradise without such (trials) as came to those who passed away before you? They were afflicted with severe poverty and ailments and were so shaken that even the Messenger and those who believed along with him said, ‘When the Help of Allah come?’ Yes! Certainly, the Help of Allah is near!” [al-Baqarah 2:214]

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A Story About Waiting

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A Story About Waiting

My journey to hijab is a story about waiting. About months and months of waiting, wishing to wear it and still not doing it out of fear of others. I was waiting for the perfect moment, but one, day I simply got tired of waiting.

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Sorority President Dons Hijab

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Sorority President Dons Hijab

I must’ve spent an hour in front of my mirror trying to wrap that bland, brown, wool scarf around my head that night. I tried wrapping clockwise, counter-clockwise, pinning above and below, finally satisfied with my first attempt at “professional dress” with the addition of a headscarf. I then had to sneak out of the house – my parents didn’t know yet, and they wouldn’t understand – and conquer my fear. I had to present myself, the president of my sorority, as a Muslim; and not just a Muslim but one who wears hijab!

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